TS55R & CMS Module

Hi Guys

 

Todays post is all about the new CMS module for the TS55R plunge saw. For those of you who aren’t familiar with the CMS system, it is in essence a Triton workcentre on steroids.

It offers a really accurate and easy to use module for the TS55R saw, a module for the PS300, 400, and hopefully PS420, jigsaws, a linisher module and possible the most outstanding router table on the market today, the CMS-OF, which fits all of Festool’s routers. though, my personal favourite is to use it with the OF 2200.

Please watch below to see the Wood Whisper’s video review on the CMS router table.

I had fun with the CMS TS55R unit but must admit to being a bit perplexed by the lack of clear assembly instructions and the inclusion of components from the old CMS TS55 Module

Please click here, (CMS TS55R) to read my full article.

As always, your questions and comments are appreciated.

Be safe and have fun

Cheers

Bryan

Trammel Routing with the OF 1010, (part 2)

Hi Guys,

After the success of last weekends foray into Gothic Trammel routing, I had a bit of free time this weekend to further refine the technique. The purpose of this exercise is twofold, firstly to see how far you can go with trammel routing, and secondly to create and refine some different router techniques for a upcoming book.

Last week I made a Gothic Trefoil Frame so this week I decided to attempt a Gothic Quatrefoil motif.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I remembered to take the camera into the  workshop this week, so I could document the process.

The  first step is to prepare the panel. There is a process to this which i’ll cover in more detail in future articles

Once the panel is prepared, the next step is to draw the design using a compass and rulers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next stage is to drill a small hole to accommodate the shaft of the trammel. the router and trammel are then placed on the workpiece and the plunge depth is set as per normal. I’m using 19 mm pine for this test piece but will only be cutting the design in 18mm deep, (it’ll make sense later) the inner line of the small circles are cut first and the position of the cutter is is determined by sighting the edge of the cutter to the pencil line.

Once your set carefully start cutting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cut each circle to the maximum depth before moving on to the next one. The trammel is visible in front of the router in the photo above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once you’ve completed the inner set, move out to the next set of rings taking care to stay within the design.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you’ve done all the straight cuts, change to a face cutting profile bit and add some detail as I’ve done on this example.

The next step is to put a scroll cut blade on your jigsaw and carefully cut the frame from the panel.

Once thats done your piece will probably look like this

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dont stress, we now turn the frame over and put a bearing guided flush trim cutter in your router or trimmer, and set it as shown below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carefully trim all edges and you’ll hopefully end up with something that resembles this,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now all it needs is a good sand and finish according to your taste.

Ok guys, thats all for this post, they’ll be more on this topic in following posts leading up to my routing book which will hopefully be ready in the next few months

As always, your comments and questions are appreciated.

Be safe and have fun,

Cheers

Bryan.

The OF 1010, Trammel Routing

Hi Guys,

I just thought I’d post a few photos from an upcoming e-book that I’m working on. Covering all aspects of the Festool OF1010, it also will include specialist sections on template work and trammel routing. The attached photos will give you an idea of some of the things you do with the 1010.

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The frame is made from a pine panel which I had left over from another project was made with an OF1010 with a Festool trammel accessory

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I’d love to know what you think so please feel free to post a comment or drop me an email.

As usual, be safe and have fun.

Cheers

Bryan

How to get the most from your Festool OF1010 Router, (Part Two)

Hi All,

Sorry its taken a couple of weeks for me to get part two of the  Festool OF 1010 series posted, but I  was floored with a dose of Flu.

In Part two we’ll further explore this great little router , showing how to insert a cutter and  focusing on the depth turrets which, from experience, seem to give people a lot of trouble.

Don’t be put off reading this article if you don’t own a Festool router as virtually every plunge router on the market will have a similar depth turret adjustment system, and the information in the article can easily be transposed between brands.

Please click here, Of 1010 Part 2  to read the full article.

In Part three we’ll  look at the accessories which can be used with the OF1010, including the Guide rail sets, accessory bases and copy rings

I hope you enjoy the article and as always, your comments and feedback are appreciated.

Articles in the pipeline include, how to make templates and use copy rings, the Festool 1400 and 2200, the Bosch GMR trimmer and a review of the new Dremel Saw-Max if I can get my hands on one.

If you have any questions on any of the information in this article, or if you’ve got any router or woodwork questions you can contact me via email or post a comment and I’ll get back to you as soon as possible.

Have fun and be safe

Cheers for now….

Bryan

How to get the most from your Festool OF1010 Router

The Festool OF 1010 Part 1

 

 

Hi Guys

Well, here’s the first part of the series of router articles that I’ll be uploading over the next few weeks.

The articles will be quite comprehensive, so on machines where there are lots of features to cover I’ll break them up into two parts. Part 1 of the OF1010  covers the basics and details all of the important parts up to the depth stop mechanism.

Part 2 which should be up next week will cover using the depth turret, copy rings, changing bases and accessories. I’ll also be including practical exercises which will give you an idea of how to create some common joints with the  OF1010.

I’m working on a series of articles which will cover template routing and how to make things such as hinge jigs and other useful jigs. Before these articles are uploaded I’ll be covering the features, functions and ideal applications of a number of popular routers and trimmers on the market. Please take the time to read these as they’ll all help to give you a greater understanding of how your machine works. Before you can begin to get the most from your Router you need a thorough understanding of all its features and functions.

Drop me a line if you have any questions about specific machines and as usual, your questions and comments are always appreciated.

to read the full OF1010 article please click here  Getting the most from your OF1010

Have fun and be safe,

Cheers for now

Bryan

 

Dovetail Keys as a Timber Joint, ( Part 1)

 

More things to do with do with dovetails.

The project that I’m working on at the moment has twelve timber shelves as part of the design.

I was able to source a selection of recycled messmate and mountain ash in small dressed boards, which I decided to use for this part of the project
The shelves needed to be a 245mm wide and the board’s ranged in width from 40mm to 80mm, so a selection of boards had to be joined together to give me a panel as near to my 245mm width as required for the project.

In an ideal world I’d be able to reach for my domino and hey presto, I’d have the shelves joined; but sadly I don’t have a domino yet, so it’s back to the drawing board.

I have a full router table set up, so another possibility is to use was biscuits, but frankly, I don’t like them You may as well butt-join the pieces for all the additional strength that you’ll gain from them.

After a bit more thought, I settled on butt joining the pieces and then adding dovetail keys, both as a means to prevent the shelves from cupping, as well as a decorative feature.

Another advantage of this method was that I’d used sliding dovetails on the shelves and dividers in the carcasses of the wall unit, so I was very familiar with the required technique.

Once I’d cut all the timber to size and jointed all the edges, the shelves were glued, and butt joined together in lots of three with a couple of sheets of newspaper placed between each of the shelves to prevent them from sticking together. The glued units were then left for 24 hrs to cure.

Once cured the shelves were planed flat to remove any irregularities and sanded to 80 grit.

As there were 12 shelves to add dovetail keys to, I made a simple jig to speed up the process of routing the channels and to ensure continuity of dovetail placement on all the shelves. The jig is just a 3-sided frame, screwed to a sacrificial board with a straight edge attached to guide the router.

The position of the trench is determined by the placement of the straight edge, relative to the edge of the board. Remember to take into account the width of your router base when working out the correct position and double check that everything’s square before you screw the straight edge to the frame.

The next step is to run a straight trench through the shelves to remove the bulk of the excess timber and to minimise strain on the dovetail cutter. I used my Festool of 1010, fitted with a 6 mm spiral uncut but to perform this task.

It’s important not to avoid this step as the removal of the excess material from the trench allows the dovetail bit to perform much better and the bit is under much less strain.

The material I chose for the dovetail keys was 19mm Sydney blue gum that gave an excellent contrast against the messmate in the shelves. So that the keys were balanced in the shelves, I decided to set them in 6mm deep.

The next stage was to set the depth of the spiral cutter in the OF 1010 to 6mm and then cut the square trenches in the shelves.

Remember to check the position of your fence before you start cutting.

If your using two different routers, as I did, the fence will need to be moved into the correct position for the dovetail trenches after you’ve cut the straight trenches.

As in my previous article on sliding dovetails, I again turned to my trusty Bosch Gmr trimmer to cut the dovetail trenches.

With the tool unplugged insert the dovetail cutter into the Gmr and set the depth, so there is 6mm of cutter protruding.

The dovetail cutter depth must be the same as the depth of the straight trench that you cut previously.

Once the trimmer is all set then double check that your fence is in the correct position and cut all of the trenches. Clean up any feathered edges on them and put the shelves aside.

 

 

 

 

Make sure you don’t remove the dovetail cutter from the trimmer or adjust the depth.

The depth of the trench is the same as the height of the dovetail key we’re going to cut in part 2

 

Part 2 of this article will cover how to make the dovetail keys.

As usual, your comments and questions are appreciated

Thanks for reading this article,

Bryan

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