Showcasing the work of Tim Coles

Hi All

Working as a retail tool specialist I’m fortunate to meet a lot of fellow woodworkers and am often asked for advice on various aspects of the projects they’re working on. One of the things I really enjoy is seeing how those projects turned out.
I received a lovely email a week or so ago with some pictures of a major commission project which one of my customers had just finished.

With his permission I’ve copied it here;

Brian,

A few months ago, I called into the shop and you gave me a hand with some
sanding stuff. m

You asked me to send you some pictures of my last job, and I’ve finally
got around to it.

I did the timber work for a cafe fit out…check out Mister Raymond, Sale,
on Facebook.

The table and benches are from Birdseye Stringybark, filled with West
Systems 207 special clear epoxy and then finished with Wattyl 7008 and
finally buffed with a paste wax. The table top was finished with my Rotex
150.

The sander is of course like nothing else I’ve used…and I’ve burnt out
one Makita and two Metabo random orbital sanders, each in about 12-18
months. One of the big advantages from the perspectives of the owners was
that I was able to do the final sanding and finishing of all the benches
in situ, thanks to the excellent dust collection of the Festool setup,
something they wished some of the other tradies would have used.

The bentwood laminations underneath the table and benchtops were from
recycled local timbers, including the falling down cattle yards next door.
And the Rotex even had a role in their finishing.

Thanks for your support and encouragement, when I get a bit more
cash-flow, don’t worry, you’ll be seeing me… First on the list is the
TS-55, then the T-18……..

Tim

The pictures Tim sent me are shown below.

Please enjoy them and if you want to see some more of Tim’s excellent work the link to his website is here.  http://timcoles.com.au/

tim 2

tim5tim 7

tim3


tim 1tim8tim6

Well done Tim for some outstanding work!!!!

If any other up and coming woodies in the Tutorwood community would like to see their work showcased on the Tutorwood site, i’d love to hear from you. particularly if you’ve used some of the techniques listed on the site. Drop me a line and send some photos to  tutorwood@gmail.com

As always, be safe and have fun.

Cheers

Bryan

The Festoolisation of Protool

Hi All,

I recently came across a new You Tube video from Festool in Germany which I thought you all might find interesting. Titled “Festool Rhythm & Tools (gb)” its a marketing video to promote the Festool brand in a very interesting way. The link to the video is here,

and while is a little bit cheesy in parts, I’d recommend you have a look as it has some particularly good vision of the inside of the Festool factory.

I was intrigued the first time i watched the video as there were some tantalising glimpses of what looked like new Festool product and what got me really curious was that they looked like crossover products from the Protool range.

Have a look at some screen grabs from the  video here:

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Now due to some commission work over the last couple of weeks I hadn’t had a lot of time to investigate this further but thanks to a dose of the flu courtesy of my 10 year old, Im off work for a couple of days and have managed to do a bit more research.

On the Slingers Ironmongers website, ( a UK based Festool Dealer)
I found a listing of New Festool Tools which are due out in the UK this September. Here’s some photos to wet you’re appetite!

Festool Duradrive 769205
Festool Duradrive Collated Screw gun 769205

Festool sword saw 769211
Festool Sword Saw 769211

Festool MFT SYS 500076
Festool MFT SYS 500076

Festool C17 768472
Festool C17 Extractor 768472

Festool Quad Drive 769202
Festool Quad Drive 769202

Festool Quadrill 769198
Festool Quadrill 769198

All bar the MFT SYS box appear to be direct crossovers from the Protool range so question now is Why?
Is the Protool range going to disappear, or are Festool, Festoolising Protool products so our Festool brothers and sisters in the North American can finally get their hands on these fantastic products. Only time will tell.

As always, your questions and comments are appreciated.

Be safe and have fun!
Cheers

Bryan

The Protool CSP 132

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Hi All,

The beastie in the photo is the Protool CSP 132 Carpentry circular Saw and if you’ve ever got the need to cut timber up to 130 mm thick, this is the tool for you.

I had the opportunity to get in one of these massive saws for for one of my regular customers last week, so as it’s really uncommon, I took the opportunity to grab a couple of pictures to show you all.

The specs for the saw are:

Cutting depth 50-132 mm
Rated input 2300 W
Saw blade diameter 350 x 30/3,5 mm
Mitre cutting 0-60 °
Rated Speed (no-load) 2200 min-1
weight 18 kg

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Whilst it’s not the tool for everyone you have to admit that it falls into the ” really cool tool category”.

Contact me if you want any more information about this or any other tools.

As always, be safe and have fun.

Cheers,

Bryan

Fitting an I.A.S module to a CT26 Extractor

Hi Everyone,

The opportunity came up last week for me to fit a IAS module to a CT26 extractor so I thought, as it’s a very uncommon request i’d take some photos to show you  how it’s done. For those of you who are scratching their heads and wondering what the hell i’m talking about, let me take a moment to explain.

The IAS, (integrated air supply)  module is part of Festool’s pneumatic sanding system and allows you to hook up a air operated sander to your CT 26 or 36 extractor for tool actuated pneumatic sanding. Once the module is installed you can decide on wether you go the hole hog and use the Festool IAS adapters and hoses  which connect to the LEX range of Festool Pneumatic sanders or simply connect an airline to the port on the extractor and use the the standard CT hose to connect to your non Festool air sander.

The beauty of the Festool system lies in the IAS hose. It is a complete unit which incorporates a central air line in which is surrounded by another hose which removes the excess air. Both of these hoses are encased in a 36mm antistatic hose which removes the sanding dust from the sander.

My client had been given a LEX 150/7 sander so he opted for the whole Festool setup.

Have a look at the photos for the set up process.

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ct26ias.2

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ct26ias.4

ct26ias.5

ct26ias.6

ct26ias.8ct26ias.7

Whilst primarily designed for the automotive industry my client, who’s a furniture finisher is using the sander with a great deal of success as a coarse sander to cut back rough surfaces on timber slabs  prior to finishing with his electric sanders.

If you’re thinking of going this way just keep two thing in mind; firstly, for air sanding operations you need a big air compressor. The module does not turn the extractor into an air compressor, (and yes i’ve been asked on more than one occasion). The second thing to take into consideration is the cost. it’s bloody expensive.

As always guys, thanks for reading. Your questions and comments are always appreciated.

Be safe and have fun!

Cheers

Bryan

Waxing Painted Timber Surfaces

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Waxing Painted timber surfaces

I recently completed a notice board for my daughter to hang her copious amounts of drawings and general tweenage girl stuff. The board is big, measuring around 1 metre by 1 metre and features offset corners for a bit of added interest.
I knew from the beginning that the piece would end up being painted so instead of using stock from the premium rack I had a fossick and ended making the noticeboard frame from some long offcuts of 90 x 35 framing pine that I had in the workshop. The idea of using bog standard timber to create a high-end decorative piece has always intrigued me, and I was looking forward to the challenge of seeing how good I could make this pedestrian timber end up looking.
When the frame was complete I filled all the imperfections and sanded the entire frame up to 1500 grit. I used the interface pad described in part 1 to ensure that I didn’t flatten any of the rounded edges on the piece.

When all the sanding was complete, I gave the entire frame its first coat of paint. The paint I used was the leftover acrylic matt ceiling paint that I used when painting my daughter’s room. The colour was tinted to a light ivory tone which gave the piece a nice warm feel.

You may be wondering why I used matt paint? Well, firstly, I had it, and I suppose I was being a bit of a cheapskate and didn’t want to buy more paint and secondly, the flat surface of the paint provided an excellent key for the wax finish.

When the first coat had had a full 24 hrs drying time I gave it a sand with 800g Vlies abrasive to de-nib the surface and prepare it for the next layer. It is important to sand slowly with minimal pressure and had the sander set to speed 1 in the Rotex mode. We need to avoid building excess heat which can affect the paint surface.
I always use Vlies during this stage of the process as it is a soft abrasive which minimises the risk of sanding through the paint surface and it gives a beautiful finish.
Clean off any excess dust then repeat the process until you’ve got at least 4 coats of paint on the frame.
When the final coat of paint is dry, sand the entire surface with 1500 grit Titan remembering to use an interface pad if required.
Wipe all surfaces to remove excess dust, then grab your can of Gilly Stephenson’s cabinet makers wax and use a soft, clean cloth to apply a thin coat to one side of the frame. Do one side at a time to ensure that the wax doesn’t set or get sticky. Put a sheet of 1500 grit Titan paper on the sander and on speed 1 in the Rotex mode, begin to gradually work the wax into the paint surface. Once the first side is done repeat the process with each of the sides until the frame is done. When you’ve completed this stage place a paper napkin on the surface then, place your sander on it and with speed set to 1, in Rotex mode, burnish the entire furnace of the piece.
The wax burnishing process described above is taken from my earlier article, “How to get the most from your Rotex” and is an excellent method to achieve a high-grade wax finish.
I’ve recently been experimenting with the white ‘Vlies’ pads which are an excellent substitute for the paper towel. While the paper towel method is certainly cheaper, still, suggest you get one or two from your local Festool dealer and try them out for yourself.

Repeat the process to build up the finish until you’ve either had enough or have reached a level of finish you like. For my work, I find that around 3 to 4 coats are sufficient but see hoe you go and stop when you’re happy with the finish.

There’s a lot of scope for experimentation with this finish so don’t be afraid to play!!

As always, thanks for reading, be safe and have fun.

Cheers

Bryan

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TS55R & CMS Module

Hi Guys

 

Todays post is all about the new CMS module for the TS55R plunge saw. For those of you who aren’t familiar with the CMS system, it is in essence a Triton workcentre on steroids.

It offers a really accurate and easy to use module for the TS55R saw, a module for the PS300, 400, and hopefully PS420, jigsaws, a linisher module and possible the most outstanding router table on the market today, the CMS-OF, which fits all of Festool’s routers. though, my personal favourite is to use it with the OF 2200.

Please watch below to see the Wood Whisper’s video review on the CMS router table.

I had fun with the CMS TS55R unit but must admit to being a bit perplexed by the lack of clear assembly instructions and the inclusion of components from the old CMS TS55 Module

Please click here, (CMS TS55R) to read my full article.

As always, your questions and comments are appreciated.

Be safe and have fun

Cheers

Bryan

Rotex + Granat + Marble = Wow

Hi Guys,

festool granat abrasive

I apologise for it being quite a while since I updated the site, but I’ve been busy behind the scenes working on an upcoming book on trammel routing and an E-book on the Rotex. Today’s post is all about the new Festool Paper “Granat” which would have hit the shelves at your local Festool dealer a few months ago.  I hadn’t had a lot of time to test it until an opportunity presented itself recently where a client of mine had a problem with some marble that needed some love and Granat proved the perfect solution.

Read the full article with the technique on how to polish stone with Granat here.

This new hybrid abrasive is impressive and I’ve found that it lasts nearly twice as long as Brilliant and Rubin on timber, Corian and stone.

Have a read and let me know what you think.

As usual, your questions and comments are appreciated.

 

Be safe and have fun,

Cheers

Bryan

 

 

Sharpening Hints


One of the more common questions I get on a weekly basis in the shop has to do with the best was to sharpen hand tools. We have the Tormek T7 and T3  sharpening systems the shelf and whilst they’re excellent units, the price does end to put a lot of people off.

I’m a hand sharpener and use a combination of diamond plates, Japanese water stones and a leather strop to sharpen all my chisels and hand plane blades.

If I’m reworking a very dull chisel I’ll usually start with a coarse diamond plate of around 320 grit which is particularly good for removing any nicks or small chips from the blade.
I’ll then move up to a 600g, then an 800 plate, 1200 plate and a 2000g plate. From there I move up to a 4000g Japanese water stone and then finish with a leather strop dressed with honing compound. At every stage of sharpening I always sharpen the bevel, then flip the tool over and flatten the back.

I find that this process gives me a uniform mirror finish on the tool which stays sharp for a long time,( depending on the timber).

The biggest issue nearly all of us have had when learning to sharpen is to figure out the best way to set the angle of the chisel or plane blade so that we can get accurate and repeatable results. There are a mountain of jig systems available to help you set the angle but I’ve found that a simple jig which you can make up yourself offers one of the best and most cost effective solutions available.

The plan for the Deneb Puchalski Angle Setting Jig features on the Lie Nielsen Australia website, but for convenience you can click here for a direct link to the plan and here for a direct link to the really useful Lie Nielsen sharpening guide.

As always your questions and comments are appreciated.

Be safe and have fun

Cheers
Bryan

The New TS55R is here!

Hi All,

Well the new TS55R is here and I’ve finally had a chance to have a bit of a play with one. Mechanically, it’s the same as the old TS55 with no changes to either the motor size or electronic components.

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The major changes are to the body of the saw with the new flat side design enabling you to cut within 12mm of a wall, or, by laying the saw on its side you easily and quickly undercut skirting boards and door frames to allow for floating floors.

You’ll also notice the change to the riving knife with the new rounded tip fitting into the saw cut more easily. The riving knife is also now in a sealed compartment of its own so you don’t have to worry about it getting clogged with swarf.

There is now a clear viewing port at the front of the blade so you can clearly see where you’re cutting. The clear port is removed and replaced with the newly designed splinter guard for splinter free offcuts.

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The measuring scale has been completely revised with a dual scale and pointer showing the cutting depth both with,(FS), and without the guide rail.

The black knob to the right of the scale is another new feature. It’s use to calibrate the blade depth. When you put a re-sharpened blade blade on the saw, set the scale to zero and plunge the saw, (without the power on), then turn the turn the knob until the tip of the place touches the work surface.

One important point to remember with the new TS55R is that owing to the body changes it will no longer fit the CMS saw table. There is a new plate on the way as well as an adapter kit to retrofit existing CMS, TS55 modules.

I’ll post more info as it comes to hand.

That’s all for now, remember to be safe and have fun.

Cheers

Bryan

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Trammel Routing with the OF 1010, (part 2)

Hi Guys,

After the success of last weekends foray into Gothic Trammel routing, I had a bit of free time this weekend to further refine the technique. The purpose of this exercise is twofold, firstly to see how far you can go with trammel routing, and secondly to create and refine some different router techniques for a upcoming book.

Last week I made a Gothic Trefoil Frame so this week I decided to attempt a Gothic Quatrefoil motif.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I remembered to take the camera into the  workshop this week, so I could document the process.

The  first step is to prepare the panel. There is a process to this which i’ll cover in more detail in future articles

Once the panel is prepared, the next step is to draw the design using a compass and rulers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next stage is to drill a small hole to accommodate the shaft of the trammel. the router and trammel are then placed on the workpiece and the plunge depth is set as per normal. I’m using 19 mm pine for this test piece but will only be cutting the design in 18mm deep, (it’ll make sense later) the inner line of the small circles are cut first and the position of the cutter is is determined by sighting the edge of the cutter to the pencil line.

Once your set carefully start cutting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cut each circle to the maximum depth before moving on to the next one. The trammel is visible in front of the router in the photo above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once you’ve completed the inner set, move out to the next set of rings taking care to stay within the design.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you’ve done all the straight cuts, change to a face cutting profile bit and add some detail as I’ve done on this example.

The next step is to put a scroll cut blade on your jigsaw and carefully cut the frame from the panel.

Once thats done your piece will probably look like this

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dont stress, we now turn the frame over and put a bearing guided flush trim cutter in your router or trimmer, and set it as shown below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carefully trim all edges and you’ll hopefully end up with something that resembles this,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now all it needs is a good sand and finish according to your taste.

Ok guys, thats all for this post, they’ll be more on this topic in following posts leading up to my routing book which will hopefully be ready in the next few months

As always, your comments and questions are appreciated.

Be safe and have fun,

Cheers

Bryan.

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