Festool sale Days

Hi Guys,
Just a quick post to let you know that Just Tools is having a Festool Sale , this Friday and Saturday.
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There will be loads of specials and demos so I hope to see you there.
For my interstate and overseas readers call just tools or email them at tools@justtools.com.au to take advantage of the special sale pricing.
I’ll be on hand both days so I hope to see you there.
Be safe and have fun
Cheers
Bryan

Showcasing the work of Tim Coles

Hi All

Working as a retail tool specialist I’m fortunate to meet a lot of fellow woodworkers and am often asked for advice on various aspects of the projects they’re working on. One of the things I really enjoy is seeing how those projects turned out.
I received a lovely email a week or so ago with some pictures of a major commission project which one of my customers had just finished.

With his permission I’ve copied it here;

Brian,

A few months ago, I called into the shop and you gave me a hand with some
sanding stuff. m

You asked me to send you some pictures of my last job, and I’ve finally
got around to it.

I did the timber work for a cafe fit out…check out Mister Raymond, Sale,
on Facebook.

The table and benches are from Birdseye Stringybark, filled with West
Systems 207 special clear epoxy and then finished with Wattyl 7008 and
finally buffed with a paste wax. The table top was finished with my Rotex
150.

The sander is of course like nothing else I’ve used…and I’ve burnt out
one Makita and two Metabo random orbital sanders, each in about 12-18
months. One of the big advantages from the perspectives of the owners was
that I was able to do the final sanding and finishing of all the benches
in situ, thanks to the excellent dust collection of the Festool setup,
something they wished some of the other tradies would have used.

The bentwood laminations underneath the table and benchtops were from
recycled local timbers, including the falling down cattle yards next door.
And the Rotex even had a role in their finishing.

Thanks for your support and encouragement, when I get a bit more
cash-flow, don’t worry, you’ll be seeing me… First on the list is the
TS-55, then the T-18……..

Tim

The pictures Tim sent me are shown below.

Please enjoy them and if you want to see some more of Tim’s excellent work the link to his website is here.  http://timcoles.com.au/

tim 2

tim5tim 7

tim3


tim 1tim8tim6

Well done Tim for some outstanding work!!!!

If any other up and coming woodies in the Tutorwood community would like to see their work showcased on the Tutorwood site, i’d love to hear from you. particularly if you’ve used some of the techniques listed on the site. Drop me a line and send some photos to  tutorwood@gmail.com

As always, be safe and have fun.

Cheers

Bryan

Waxing Painted Timber Surfaces

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Waxing Painted timber surfaces

I recently completed a notice board for my daughter to hang her copious amounts of drawings and general tweenage girl stuff. The board is big, measuring around 1 metre by 1 metre and features offset corners for a bit of added interest.
I knew from the beginning that the piece would end up being painted so instead of using stock from the premium rack I had a fossick and ended making the noticeboard frame from some long offcuts of 90 x 35 framing pine that I had in the workshop. The idea of using bog standard timber to create a high-end decorative piece has always intrigued me, and I was looking forward to the challenge of seeing how good I could make this pedestrian timber end up looking.
When the frame was complete I filled all the imperfections and sanded the entire frame up to 1500 grit. I used the interface pad described in part 1 to ensure that I didn’t flatten any of the rounded edges on the piece.

When all the sanding was complete, I gave the entire frame its first coat of paint. The paint I used was the leftover acrylic matt ceiling paint that I used when painting my daughter’s room. The colour was tinted to a light ivory tone which gave the piece a nice warm feel.

You may be wondering why I used matt paint? Well, firstly, I had it, and I suppose I was being a bit of a cheapskate and didn’t want to buy more paint and secondly, the flat surface of the paint provided an excellent key for the wax finish.

When the first coat had had a full 24 hrs drying time I gave it a sand with 800g Vlies abrasive to de-nib the surface and prepare it for the next layer. It is important to sand slowly with minimal pressure and had the sander set to speed 1 in the Rotex mode. We need to avoid building excess heat which can affect the paint surface.
I always use Vlies during this stage of the process as it is a soft abrasive which minimises the risk of sanding through the paint surface and it gives a beautiful finish.
Clean off any excess dust then repeat the process until you’ve got at least 4 coats of paint on the frame.
When the final coat of paint is dry, sand the entire surface with 1500 grit Titan remembering to use an interface pad if required.
Wipe all surfaces to remove excess dust, then grab your can of Gilly Stephenson’s cabinet makers wax and use a soft, clean cloth to apply a thin coat to one side of the frame. Do one side at a time to ensure that the wax doesn’t set or get sticky. Put a sheet of 1500 grit Titan paper on the sander and on speed 1 in the Rotex mode, begin to gradually work the wax into the paint surface. Once the first side is done repeat the process with each of the sides until the frame is done. When you’ve completed this stage place a paper napkin on the surface then, place your sander on it and with speed set to 1, in Rotex mode, burnish the entire furnace of the piece.
The wax burnishing process described above is taken from my earlier article, “How to get the most from your Rotex” and is an excellent method to achieve a high-grade wax finish.
I’ve recently been experimenting with the white ‘Vlies’ pads which are an excellent substitute for the paper towel. While the paper towel method is certainly cheaper, still, suggest you get one or two from your local Festool dealer and try them out for yourself.

Repeat the process to build up the finish until you’ve either had enough or have reached a level of finish you like. For my work, I find that around 3 to 4 coats are sufficient but see hoe you go and stop when you’re happy with the finish.

There’s a lot of scope for experimentation with this finish so don’t be afraid to play!!

As always, thanks for reading, be safe and have fun.

Cheers

Bryan

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The Festool Surfix Oiler System, (Part 2)

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A wet oil finish with an Ets 150/5

The Festool surfix oiler system, part 2

In the previous article on the new Festool oil system I produced a set of samples in both hardwood and softwood to see how easy it was to use the new oil system when following the instructions provided with the kit. Whilst the application method worked I wasn’t happy with having to leave the project for 8 hours between coats, so I thought I’d try the Festool oils using the wet burnishing method which I’ve used extensively with other oil finishes to see how good a finish would result.

For this test I’ll again be turning to my Ets 150/5 sander and the timber I’m using will be Sydney Blue gum for the hardwood sample and Baltic pine for the softwood.

The blue gum is recycled flooring and had already been sanded to about 120 g but the Baltic I have is in rough sawn boards; so once I’d dressed the Baltic,( by hand !) I was ready to begin.
In the Festool method that I wrote about in the previous blog, the samples were only sanded to 320g.
In the wet burnishing method we’ll be using both Festool Brilliant 2 and Titan papers and sanding up to 1500g. To achieve the best finish, It’s very important to remember the basic sanding rules relating to sander speed and grit size when using this method.
Use the table below as a guide to help select the appropriate speed for the grit your using.


Brilliant 2 Abrasives

Grit: Speed:
40. 6

60. 6

80. 6

120. 5

150. 5

180. 5

240. 4

320. 4

400. 3


Titan Abrasives
Grit: Speed:
500. 3

800. 2

1000. 2

1200. 1

1500 & finer 1


This chart is a suggested range only and results can vary depending on the type of timber that you’re using for your project.
If your using a Rotex sander remember to use the Rotex, random orbital technique as described in the “How do I get the best from my Rotex” article which is listed on the main page of this blog. If your using an ETS sander just work carefully though the progressive grades of paper paying close attention to the speed settings on the sander.

Once you’ve reached 1200 grit stop, as now we’re going to apply our first coat of oil. It you haven’t read my previous article on using the Festool oiler system, I’d suggest that you pause here and go back and have a look at it, particularly the section on loading and using the applicator pad.
Once you’ve chosen your oil and have the applicator pad set up apply an even coat of oil to the work piece. Try not to get too heavy a coat as repeated thin applications will give you a far better result than thick coats.
Once applied leave it for no more that 15 minutes then grab your sander with the sheet of 1500 grit Titan paper on it and , with the speed set to 1, begin to sand the surface of the work piece, gently and evenly working the oil into the timber. The small amount of heat generated by this process will open the pore of the timber allowing the oil to penetrate.
Work the oil into the timber for about 5 minutes ensuring that you cover all areas on the workpiece.
Once you’ve done this place a paper napkin on the workpiece, place your sander on top of the napkin, (don’t remove the abrasive) check that the sander is still on speed 1,then gently polish the entire surface of the workpiece. The napkin serves a twofold purpose in this technique. The abrasive properties of the napkin are around 6000 grit which serves to gently burnish the surface whilst the paper absorbs any excess oil from the work.
Put the piece aside for about an hour to give the oil more of a chance to dry then repeat the process from the oil application step, until you’ve achieved the level of finish you’re after.
I’d recommend a minimum of four coats of oil to achieve a good degree of protection , though the more coats you do, the better the final result.
Be sure to leave at least 24 hrs after application of the final coat of oil and give it a final buff using your sander and a paper napkin before you use your piece.

Safety note: Handle all materials with due care and be sure to clean up your work area and wash your hands properly when you have finished using these products. There is always a risk of spontaneous combustion of rags used in oil finishes if not stored correctly. Soak and rags used in water then dispose of in a bin outside your workshop when you’ve finished for the day.
Use all relevant personal protection equipment, ( safety glasses, hearing protection, etc) when using any of the techniques listed on this website.
Work safe, Have fun.

I hope you enjoyed this article and as usual, your comments and questions are always appreciated.

The next series of articles I’ll be posting will cover a the things you need to know about routers

Cheers

Bryan

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