Routed Septafoil Frame

The first of 6 coats of Gesso goes down.

Due to the current humidity, I’ll give it 48 hrs before giving it light sand then the next coat.

Still undecided between a lacquer or gold leaf finish.

Be safe and have fun

Cheers
Bryan

 

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ETS EC 150 Festool Brushless Sanders

Hi All,

Recently released in Europe Festool’s new  sanders the ETS EC 150/5 and ETS 150/3 are sure to be a hit when they reach the Australian market. With the latest in EC brushless motors these sanders have a host of new features to make the onerous task of sanding quicker and easier.

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Some of the new features are a vibration sensor which automatically adjusts the sander speed when not under load to protect the user from excess vibration, constant speed under load, and a suction detection system which stops the sander if the dust extractor hose comes out, (this feature can be deactivated if you’re using a dust bag).

The new sanders have a height of 113mm including pad, compared to 185mm on the old ETS sanders and a weight of 1.2 kg which is 600 grams lighter than the old ETS sanders

Have a look at the video below to see the ETS EC 150 in action and watch for a cameo appearance by Blair, one of the principals  of Festool Australia

Please watch this space and as more information comes to hand I’ll post it here

Be safe and have fun

Cheers

Bryan

The Festool CT 17E Extractor

Hi Guys,

I’ve finally had a chance to put pen to paper and complete my write up of the new CT 17E extractor.

It’s one of the Protool to Festool conversions and has evolved from the Protool VCP 170E. I found to be an excellent and highly efficient machine and to date has performed all the work I’ve expected of it with no hiccups at all.

Click on this link  The CT17E Extractor to read my full review of this awesome little machine.

One of the best features of this machine is the price. at under $450 (AUD) with a 36mm hose and cleaning set it’s an absolute bargain. Click Here to check out the CT 17 on the Just Tools website.

In all honesty, if you’re on a budget an want a small fully featured extractor for under $500 you cant go past this!

As always, thanks for reading and feel free to post any questions of comments.

Be safe and have fun.

Cheers

Bryan

 

Waxing Painted Timber Surfaces

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Waxing Painted timber surfaces

I recently completed a notice board for my daughter to hang her copious amounts of drawings and general tweenage girl stuff. The board is big, measuring around 1 metre by 1 metre and features offset corners for a bit of added interest.
I knew from the beginning that the piece would end up being painted so instead of using stock from the premium rack I had a fossick and ended making the noticeboard frame from some long offcuts of 90 x 35 framing pine that I had in the workshop. The idea of using bog standard timber to create a high-end decorative piece has always intrigued me, and I was looking forward to the challenge of seeing how good I could make this pedestrian timber end up looking.
When the frame was complete I filled all the imperfections and sanded the entire frame up to 1500 grit. I used the interface pad described in part 1 to ensure that I didn’t flatten any of the rounded edges on the piece.

When all the sanding was complete, I gave the entire frame its first coat of paint. The paint I used was the leftover acrylic matt ceiling paint that I used when painting my daughter’s room. The colour was tinted to a light ivory tone which gave the piece a nice warm feel.

You may be wondering why I used matt paint? Well, firstly, I had it, and I suppose I was being a bit of a cheapskate and didn’t want to buy more paint and secondly, the flat surface of the paint provided an excellent key for the wax finish.

When the first coat had had a full 24 hrs drying time I gave it a sand with 800g Vlies abrasive to de-nib the surface and prepare it for the next layer. It is important to sand slowly with minimal pressure and had the sander set to speed 1 in the Rotex mode. We need to avoid building excess heat which can affect the paint surface.
I always use Vlies during this stage of the process as it is a soft abrasive which minimises the risk of sanding through the paint surface and it gives a beautiful finish.
Clean off any excess dust then repeat the process until you’ve got at least 4 coats of paint on the frame.
When the final coat of paint is dry, sand the entire surface with 1500 grit Titan remembering to use an interface pad if required.
Wipe all surfaces to remove excess dust, then grab your can of Gilly Stephenson’s cabinet makers wax and use a soft, clean cloth to apply a thin coat to one side of the frame. Do one side at a time to ensure that the wax doesn’t set or get sticky. Put a sheet of 1500 grit Titan paper on the sander and on speed 1 in the Rotex mode, begin to gradually work the wax into the paint surface. Once the first side is done repeat the process with each of the sides until the frame is done. When you’ve completed this stage place a paper napkin on the surface then, place your sander on it and with speed set to 1, in Rotex mode, burnish the entire furnace of the piece.
The wax burnishing process described above is taken from my earlier article, “How to get the most from your Rotex” and is an excellent method to achieve a high-grade wax finish.
I’ve recently been experimenting with the white ‘Vlies’ pads which are an excellent substitute for the paper towel. While the paper towel method is certainly cheaper, still, suggest you get one or two from your local Festool dealer and try them out for yourself.

Repeat the process to build up the finish until you’ve either had enough or have reached a level of finish you like. For my work, I find that around 3 to 4 coats are sufficient but see hoe you go and stop when you’re happy with the finish.

There’s a lot of scope for experimentation with this finish so don’t be afraid to play!!

As always, thanks for reading, be safe and have fun.

Cheers

Bryan

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Festool Hand Sanding Pad


Hand sanding pad

For those occasions when an electric sander is too aggressive or when you’re sanding delicate materials such as small mouldings, the hand sanding pad, (Festool part # 495966) is an absolute gem.

The pad features a Velcro backing which wraps around the piece and easily accepts all styles of 150mm diameter abrasives. I’ve teamed it up with the new series of Granat papers to sand small timber mouldings up to 1500 grit for a project I’m working on and have been extremely satisfied with the results to date.

Available as either a hard or soft pad and selling for under $40.00 they’re a worthwhile addition to your sanding kit.

As always, your questions and comments are appreciated

Be safe and have fun,

Cheers

Bryan

TS55R & CMS Module

Hi Guys

 

Todays post is all about the new CMS module for the TS55R plunge saw. For those of you who aren’t familiar with the CMS system, it is in essence a Triton workcentre on steroids.

It offers a really accurate and easy to use module for the TS55R saw, a module for the PS300, 400, and hopefully PS420, jigsaws, a linisher module and possible the most outstanding router table on the market today, the CMS-OF, which fits all of Festool’s routers. though, my personal favourite is to use it with the OF 2200.

Please watch below to see the Wood Whisper’s video review on the CMS router table.

I had fun with the CMS TS55R unit but must admit to being a bit perplexed by the lack of clear assembly instructions and the inclusion of components from the old CMS TS55 Module

Please click here, (CMS TS55R) to read my full article.

As always, your questions and comments are appreciated.

Be safe and have fun

Cheers

Bryan

Rotex + Granat + Marble = Wow

Hi Guys,

festool granat abrasive

I apologise for it being quite a while since I updated the site, but I’ve been busy behind the scenes working on an upcoming book on trammel routing and an E-book on the Rotex. Today’s post is all about the new Festool Paper “Granat” which would have hit the shelves at your local Festool dealer a few months ago.  I hadn’t had a lot of time to test it until an opportunity presented itself recently where a client of mine had a problem with some marble that needed some love and Granat proved the perfect solution.

Read the full article with the technique on how to polish stone with Granat here.

This new hybrid abrasive is impressive and I’ve found that it lasts nearly twice as long as Brilliant and Rubin on timber, Corian and stone.

Have a read and let me know what you think.

As usual, your questions and comments are appreciated.

 

Be safe and have fun,

Cheers

Bryan

 

 

Protool UniverS SSP 200 EB, Sword saw

Hi All,

Today we’re going to have a look at a relatively new tool from Festool’s sister company Protool. The SSP 200 EB is a bit of an unusual beastie and I remember the the first time  saw it I was a bit perplexed by it.

The SSP is in essence, a chain saw that’s mounted onto a circular saw base. It has a  maximum cutting depth of 200mm (about 8 inches) and it runs along standard Festool or Protool, guide rails for accuracy and ease of cut.

Its not a tool that you have to have but if you’re regularly cutting sleepers, timber beams, or LVL, (laminated veneered lumber) boards or girders, the SSP is guaranteed to make your life easier

Designed for cutting large beams the SSP which weighs in at only 6.5 KG ( 14 Pound) is a lot easier and safer option than circular saws with a comparable cutting depth such as the Protool CSP 165 which weighs in at 22kg, (48 pounds)

The CSP 165E

I’ve used both the CSP 165 and the SSP extensively and, personally i’d now always choose the SSP over a large and heavy circular saw.

When docking beams to length with the SSP you can tilt the blade forwards at a 10 degree angle which exposes more blade to the timber and gives you a proportionately faster cut. The maximum mitre angle on the SSP is 60 degrees and when used on a guide rail will pivot on the scribe line in the same manner as a TS 55 or TS 75 will.

Lets have a look at the features of the SSP;

1, Blade,

2, Fast Fix Blade Changing

3, Guide Slot for Guide Rail

4, Mitre Angle indicator

5, Tool less chain tension adjustment

6,Tool Less chain lubrication

7,MMC, (constant speed under load) electronics

8, Bar oil level indicator

9, Dust Extractor Connection

10, Auxiliary Handle

11, Clearly visible cut indicator.

Not being a major fan of chainsaws, I must admit to being a bit nervous when using the SSP for the first time but, within 5 minutes I was as happy as a pig in …….., and had chopped up a large beam into small pieces before I realised it. When connected to a CT26 dust extractor,  with the 36mm hose about 2 thirds of the dust was collected leaving only a relatively small amount to clean up.

Click below to watch a video of the SSP in action.

As you can see from the video there is plenty of different applications for the SSP. Ive used it on both softwoods an Australian Hardwoods and found that it didn’t struggle with either of them.

No review of the SSP would be complete without giving you the chance to watch the Official Protool film on the SSP. Its the first Big Budget advert for a power tool that I can remember seeing in a long time.

Enjoy !!!!!

Well I hope you enjoyed that.

As always, your comments and questions are appreciated.

Be safe and have fun

Cheers,

Bryan

My Cordless Mitre Saw

The Nobex Proman

Sometimes you don’t need a power cord……..

During my recent break from the Monday to Friday job I was able to get enough time to cross another project off my very long home renovation to do list.

When we moved in to our current abode we were faced with the problem of bugger all space in the pantry, so in the tried and true fashion of woodies everywhere I set to work one weekend and constructed a large addition to the existing pantry.

With six large sliding drawers and six fixed shelves and constructed from melamine coated MDF, the new unit was spacious, but with the MDF edges of the carcass and drawers visible it was butt ugly. My intention was to clad the exposed edges and drawer faces in solid timber but as with all good intentions they can sometimes get a bit delayed.

That was three years ago…….

Fast forward to 2012 and with free time on my hands and about 100 lineal meters of recycled  Sydney Blue Gum floorboards to play with, I plunged headlong into the task at hand.

Once I’d made the drawer faces I ripped the trim to about 2mm larger all round then hand planed it to the required size.

I did a couple of test cuts with my Bosch mitre saw but as Sydney Blue Gum is fairly brittle and my saw blade was a bit coarse the end result was not brilliant. Rather than go out and spend $100+ on a new 80 tooth blade I turned to old faithful, my Nobex Proman mitre saw.

I bought this saw over 12 years ago when I was making a lot of bespoke picture frames, (that’s another story), and it’s never let me down. With a 32 tpi blade fitted it  made short work of all the capping and trim for this project.

The Nobex is perfect or when you need to  get up close and personal to the without risking life and limb, or as shown above you  need only to trim a small amount off.

To watch a video of the Proman please click here.

If you’re interested and want to find out more information about where to get a Proman, please click here.    http://www.justtools.com.au/prod4710.htm

Thats all for now guys,

As always, your comments and questions are appreciated

Cheers

Bryan

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