The Profi Scale Moisture Meter

Moisture 2 Hi All,

Sadly,  I had a death in the tool box last week. after one too many drops, my old moisture meter finally gave up.

So after a suitable period of mourning, (about 12 seconds) I decided to update to to the new Profi scale moisture meters by Burg Wachter that arrived in the shop last week.

 

 

 

Whats cool about these meters is that as well as measuring the moisture level of wood you can quickly change the settings so you can measure the moisture content of plasterboard, (drywall) screed and gypsum as well as ambient temperature in Celsius and Fahrenheit.

The tech specs for the moisture meter is shown here:

Technical data

Measurement range Wood: 4 – 60 %Moist 3
Solid materials: 0.2 – 3.0 %
Resolution Wood: 1 %
Solid materials: 0.1 %
Accuracy Wood: < 30 %: ± 2 % ≥ 30 %: ± 4 %
Solid materials: < 1.4 %: ± 0.1 %
≥ 1.4 %: ± 0.2 %
Power supply 4 × 1.5 V (e. g. LR44)
Optimum ambient conditions 0 °C – 40 °C, air humidity: < 85 %
Storage temperature -10 °C – 50 °C,
air humidity: < 85 %

 

When I use a  moisture meter I’ll always  take  a number of readings from different points on the timber then work out an average. The meter was simple to use moisture 1and  when I measured the same point in the
timber 4 times I got the same read every time, ( unlike my old meter)

Also in the manual is this handy table which give you a rough idea of how to interpret the data from the meter.

Humidity content in weight percent
Humidity status Wood        Screed, gypsum, plaster
Inoffensive 2 – 15 %              0,2 – 0,3 %
Borderline 15 – 19 %            0,4 – 0,9 %
Too humid > 20 % > 1,0 %

Please keep in  mind when using this scale that it’s only a general idea. Moisture content varies between species and where you are in the world. Remember to take multiple readings and work out an average.

What I also love about this meter is the size, (See photo below), and the price.

moisture 4At under $40.00 (AUD) its an absolute bargain for all the features it has. If you’re in the market for a new meter have a look here.

Thats all for now guys, as always be safe and have fun,

Cheers

Bryan

 

 

The Festool CT 17E Extractor

Hi Guys,

I’ve finally had a chance to put pen to paper and complete my write up of the new CT 17E extractor.

It’s one of the Protool to Festool conversions and has evolved from the Protool VCP 170E. I found to be an excellent and highly efficient machine and to date has performed all the work I’ve expected of it with no hiccups at all.

Click on this link  The CT17E Extractor to read my full review of this awesome little machine.

One of the best features of this machine is the price. at under $450 (AUD) with a 36mm hose and cleaning set it’s an absolute bargain. Click Here to check out the CT 17 on the Just Tools website.

In all honesty, if you’re on a budget an want a small fully featured extractor for under $500 you cant go past this!

As always, thanks for reading and feel free to post any questions of comments.

Be safe and have fun.

Cheers

Bryan

 

Protool PDP 20-4, New Video

Hi Guys,

The new Protool PDP 20-4 is on the way so please have a look at this new video on this outstanding tool which has been uploaded today by a Protool user in Russia

There’s no accompanying dialog and the production values aren’t fabulous but this will give you a really good idea of what this tool can do and the accessories that form part of the system

Please enjoy and let me know what you think.

As soon as I get a firm release date I let you all know.

As always, be safe and have fun

Cheers

Bryan

Protool UniverS SSP 200 EB, Sword saw

Hi All,

Today we’re going to have a look at a relatively new tool from Festool’s sister company Protool. The SSP 200 EB is a bit of an unusual beastie and I remember the the first time  saw it I was a bit perplexed by it.

The SSP is in essence, a chain saw that’s mounted onto a circular saw base. It has a  maximum cutting depth of 200mm (about 8 inches) and it runs along standard Festool or Protool, guide rails for accuracy and ease of cut.

Its not a tool that you have to have but if you’re regularly cutting sleepers, timber beams, or LVL, (laminated veneered lumber) boards or girders, the SSP is guaranteed to make your life easier

Designed for cutting large beams the SSP which weighs in at only 6.5 KG ( 14 Pound) is a lot easier and safer option than circular saws with a comparable cutting depth such as the Protool CSP 165 which weighs in at 22kg, (48 pounds)

The CSP 165E

I’ve used both the CSP 165 and the SSP extensively and, personally i’d now always choose the SSP over a large and heavy circular saw.

When docking beams to length with the SSP you can tilt the blade forwards at a 10 degree angle which exposes more blade to the timber and gives you a proportionately faster cut. The maximum mitre angle on the SSP is 60 degrees and when used on a guide rail will pivot on the scribe line in the same manner as a TS 55 or TS 75 will.

Lets have a look at the features of the SSP;

1, Blade,

2, Fast Fix Blade Changing

3, Guide Slot for Guide Rail

4, Mitre Angle indicator

5, Tool less chain tension adjustment

6,Tool Less chain lubrication

7,MMC, (constant speed under load) electronics

8, Bar oil level indicator

9, Dust Extractor Connection

10, Auxiliary Handle

11, Clearly visible cut indicator.

Not being a major fan of chainsaws, I must admit to being a bit nervous when using the SSP for the first time but, within 5 minutes I was as happy as a pig in …….., and had chopped up a large beam into small pieces before I realised it. When connected to a CT26 dust extractor,  with the 36mm hose about 2 thirds of the dust was collected leaving only a relatively small amount to clean up.

Click below to watch a video of the SSP in action.

As you can see from the video there is plenty of different applications for the SSP. Ive used it on both softwoods an Australian Hardwoods and found that it didn’t struggle with either of them.

No review of the SSP would be complete without giving you the chance to watch the Official Protool film on the SSP. Its the first Big Budget advert for a power tool that I can remember seeing in a long time.

Enjoy !!!!!

Well I hope you enjoyed that.

As always, your comments and questions are appreciated.

Be safe and have fun

Cheers,

Bryan

My Two Favorite Hand Planes

20120131-151249.jpg

I have a real passion for hand planes and have quite a good collection, but when It comes down to it the two planes pictures here are the ones I reach for 90% of the time.

The larger of the two is an antique smoothing plane made by Stewart Spiers, from Ayr Scotland.
The smaller of the two is a Lie Nielsen skew angle block plane.

Cheers,
//

Bryan

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