Calibrating The TS55R Blade

Five Minutes With Festool – The TS55

Let’s assume that we’ve just had a blade sharpened and we need to check the calibration between the cutting depth and the depth scale. Remember that when a blade is sharpened you invariably loose a small amount of the blade diameter. After one sharpen it may not be noticeable, but after two or three sharpens there can be a noticeable variation in your cutting depth.

 This method can also be used to fine tune the cutting depth if you’re using the saw on a different brand of guide rail, (not that I’d recommend that), as there can be a variation in the standard 5mm thickness between brands. 

To calibrate the blade on a TS55R, place the base of the saw on a piece of paper (A4 copy paper is ideal), on a  flat smooth surface and set the depth guide to zero. As we’re not on the guide rail make sure you use the unmarked indicator rather than the FS indicator.

Set To Zero
Depth Gauge set to zero. Note the blade calibration knob to the right of the FS mark.
plunged
Fully Plunged, note the plunge stop resting on the calibration knob.

Once set, gently plunge the saw down until it stops and look to see if the tips of the blade are touching the paper

Blade too high
Blade too high

Adjust by turning the calibration knob on the top of the saw until the tips of the blade just touch the piece of paper and you’re done.

Blade Set
Blade set correctly

 

 

A good habit to get into is to periodically check this to make ensure that you TS55 is working at its best at all times. 

I hope you found this “Five minutes with Festool” useful and as always your questions and comments are appreciated.

Have fun and be safe,

Cheers

Bryan

Festool, technique, training, TS55R, cool tools, blades, woodwork, power tools,

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The General Digital Sliding T-Bevel.

Hi All,

One of the projects that I’ve been putting a lot of time into recently is a book on pushing  the boundaries on router trammel work so you can create pieces such as the Septafoil frame shown below.

(Please keep in mind the frame in the photo is a draft piece cut out  of a 25mm thick MDF sheet and was created to test the process i’ve developed. The next one will be in hardwood)

Septafoil Blog

The frame is trammel routed using the Festool MFS routing template long with my trusty Festool OF1010 router.

Frames like this are an exercise in geometry and begin as a design on my sketchpad which is where I create the form, and work out the angles and measurements so I can transfer them to my full size panel.

A couple of months ago I discovered the General Digital sliding T bevel and since then my design work has moved forward in leaps and bounds.

I use the general to set angles in sketches, to assess how a variation in angle changes the structure I’m developing and when I’m happy with a design, to quickly and accurately transfer the design onto a panel.

Please take the time to watch the video here which shows more applications for this awesome tool.

The General has four buttons next to the digital display which you use to operate the tool.

They are;

Power, the red one.

Zero, to zero the tool for use

Hold Flip, which either lock the current measurement on the display or flips the display so you don’t have to look at it upside down.

Reverse, Which changes the display from an reflex angle , (between 180 and 360 degrees) to a an acute angle.

 

General 2_edited-1

All in all this is one of the most  useful tools I’ve come across recently and I am certain you’ll find it a worth addition to your toolbox.

Want one – Click here

As always, your questions and comments are appreciated.

Be safe and have fun.

Cheers

Bryan

ETS EC 150 Festool Brushless Sanders

Hi All,

Recently released in Europe Festool’s new  sanders the ETS EC 150/5 and ETS 150/3 are sure to be a hit when they reach the Australian market. With the latest in EC brushless motors these sanders have a host of new features to make the onerous task of sanding quicker and easier.

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Some of the new features are a vibration sensor which automatically adjusts the sander speed when not under load to protect the user from excess vibration, constant speed under load, and a suction detection system which stops the sander if the dust extractor hose comes out, (this feature can be deactivated if you’re using a dust bag).

The new sanders have a height of 113mm including pad, compared to 185mm on the old ETS sanders and a weight of 1.2 kg which is 600 grams lighter than the old ETS sanders

Have a look at the video below to see the ETS EC 150 in action and watch for a cameo appearance by Blair, one of the principals  of Festool Australia

Please watch this space and as more information comes to hand I’ll post it here

Be safe and have fun

Cheers

Bryan

The Profi Scale Moisture Meter

Moisture 2 Hi All,

Sadly,  I had a death in the tool box last week. after one too many drops, my old moisture meter finally gave up.

So after a suitable period of mourning, (about 12 seconds) I decided to update to to the new Profi scale moisture meters by Burg Wachter that arrived in the shop last week.

 

 

 

Whats cool about these meters is that as well as measuring the moisture level of wood you can quickly change the settings so you can measure the moisture content of plasterboard, (drywall) screed and gypsum as well as ambient temperature in Celsius and Fahrenheit.

The tech specs for the moisture meter is shown here:

Technical data

Measurement range Wood: 4 – 60 %Moist 3
Solid materials: 0.2 – 3.0 %
Resolution Wood: 1 %
Solid materials: 0.1 %
Accuracy Wood: < 30 %: ± 2 % ≥ 30 %: ± 4 %
Solid materials: < 1.4 %: ± 0.1 %
≥ 1.4 %: ± 0.2 %
Power supply 4 × 1.5 V (e. g. LR44)
Optimum ambient conditions 0 °C – 40 °C, air humidity: < 85 %
Storage temperature -10 °C – 50 °C,
air humidity: < 85 %

 

When I use a  moisture meter I’ll always  take  a number of readings from different points on the timber then work out an average. The meter was simple to use moisture 1and  when I measured the same point in the
timber 4 times I got the same read every time, ( unlike my old meter)

Also in the manual is this handy table which give you a rough idea of how to interpret the data from the meter.

Humidity content in weight percent
Humidity status Wood        Screed, gypsum, plaster
Inoffensive 2 – 15 %              0,2 – 0,3 %
Borderline 15 – 19 %            0,4 – 0,9 %
Too humid > 20 % > 1,0 %

Please keep in  mind when using this scale that it’s only a general idea. Moisture content varies between species and where you are in the world. Remember to take multiple readings and work out an average.

What I also love about this meter is the size, (See photo below), and the price.

moisture 4At under $40.00 (AUD) its an absolute bargain for all the features it has. If you’re in the market for a new meter have a look here.

Thats all for now guys, as always be safe and have fun,

Cheers

Bryan

 

 

Festool TS55C Australian Release Date !!!!

 

Hi All,

Following a random post, by Blair Brydon, one of the heads of Festool Australia, on the woodwork forum website, it’s now confirmed that the Australian release for the TSC 55 is August 1 2014.

I’ve found a couple of new videos which you may  of may not of seen which will give you a bit more info on the new Cordless TSC 55 prior to its arrival.

The first video is from Festool USA’s connect 2014 event which was held in March this year and features Festool USA Application Trainer Brian Sedgeley demonstrating the TSC 55

The second is from ITS in the UK and is an in depth look at the tool, covering battery compatibility. accessories, the new Fastfix 2 mechanism  reveals that  the TSC55 is a brushless saw .

As more information becomes available closer to the release date, particularly the shelf price, I’ll post it here.

As always, be safe and have fun.

Cheers

Bryan

Festool Vecturo OS 400 Update

Hi All,

I’ve had a couple of days off work with a rotten dose of the Flu and now that my brain is beginning to work again I’ve had a chance to trawl the web to come up with any info I could find on the new Festool products that will potentially be hitting our shores this year.

The Vecturo OS 400.

From discussions I have  had with both Festool (Aust) and Fein (Aust) I can now confirm that the Vecturo is a joint venture between Festool and Fein and is a Fein Supercut that has been “Festoolized”.

Have a look at the video below that’s presented by Frank Jaksch, from Festool  Germany for a good overview of the tool and make sure that you pay particular attention to the depth stop accessory and the positioning aid that are shown in the video. The positioning aid looks particularly interesting to me as it looks to solve the challenge of getting a square plunge cut which is a problem with any oscillating tool.

I’ll be interested to see how Festool market the Vecturo in Australia as any Fein stockist will confirm that the Fein Supercut is a bloody hard tool to sell owing to the price and the requirement for different blades. ( The Supercut can use multimaster blades with an adapter)

As yet there is no firm release date for the Vecturo in Australia but given that it has not hit Festool UK yet I think that it’s fairly certain that we wont see it here till the first quarter of 2015.

Anyway, thats all I have on the Vecturo. As more information comes to hand I’ll post it here.

As always be safe and have fun,

Cheers

Bryan

Vectro 1

The Works Of Chris Vesper

chris 1JPG

Hi All

As a woodworker for over 20 years I, as many of us do, have an appreciation of finely made hand tools. They seem to make a job flow a bit  easier and a quality tool feels “right” in your hands. About six years ago during my time at Festool I had the chance to get to know an up and coming toolmaker by the name of Chris Vesper. Over the  next few years and countless working with wood shows I came to know Chris fairly well and purchased a number of tools from him which I used in the training sessions I ran for Festool.

My undoubted favourite would have to be the sliding bevel ( pictured) which still sees regular use most weekends setting out dovetails.

After I left Festool lost touch with Chris but caught up with him again at this years Working with Wood show. It was great to see that Chris’s range is still expanding and his reputation as a quality toolmaker is still growing.

pwm1213_250 (1)I was delighted to see a feature length article on Chris in the December 2013 issue of Popular Woodworking magazine which was written by the hand tool maestro Christopher Schwarz, of “Lost Art Press” fame.  It’s outstanding to see a local Aussie toolmaker featured in an international magazine of this standing. 

You can see more of the tools made by Chris on his Vesper Tools website.  Please keep Chris in mind if you need to update your layout tools and lets support Australian made tools.

As always, be safe and have fun

Cheers

Bryan

chris aaa2 chris bbbb1

Showcasing the work of Tim Coles

Hi All

Working as a retail tool specialist I’m fortunate to meet a lot of fellow woodworkers and am often asked for advice on various aspects of the projects they’re working on. One of the things I really enjoy is seeing how those projects turned out.
I received a lovely email a week or so ago with some pictures of a major commission project which one of my customers had just finished.

With his permission I’ve copied it here;

Brian,

A few months ago, I called into the shop and you gave me a hand with some
sanding stuff. m

You asked me to send you some pictures of my last job, and I’ve finally
got around to it.

I did the timber work for a cafe fit out…check out Mister Raymond, Sale,
on Facebook.

The table and benches are from Birdseye Stringybark, filled with West
Systems 207 special clear epoxy and then finished with Wattyl 7008 and
finally buffed with a paste wax. The table top was finished with my Rotex
150.

The sander is of course like nothing else I’ve used…and I’ve burnt out
one Makita and two Metabo random orbital sanders, each in about 12-18
months. One of the big advantages from the perspectives of the owners was
that I was able to do the final sanding and finishing of all the benches
in situ, thanks to the excellent dust collection of the Festool setup,
something they wished some of the other tradies would have used.

The bentwood laminations underneath the table and benchtops were from
recycled local timbers, including the falling down cattle yards next door.
And the Rotex even had a role in their finishing.

Thanks for your support and encouragement, when I get a bit more
cash-flow, don’t worry, you’ll be seeing me… First on the list is the
TS-55, then the T-18……..

Tim

The pictures Tim sent me are shown below.

Please enjoy them and if you want to see some more of Tim’s excellent work the link to his website is here.  http://timcoles.com.au/

tim 2

tim5tim 7

tim3


tim 1tim8tim6

Well done Tim for some outstanding work!!!!

If any other up and coming woodies in the Tutorwood community would like to see their work showcased on the Tutorwood site, i’d love to hear from you. particularly if you’ve used some of the techniques listed on the site. Drop me a line and send some photos to  tutorwood@gmail.com

As always, be safe and have fun.

Cheers

Bryan

The Festool APS 900 Jig, making a masons mitre joint.

image

 

The Masons Mitre,

With its roots in stone masonry the masons mitre joint has evolved a commonly used joint in kitchen renovation where it is used to join bench tops together at a 45 degree angle

The masons mitre was originally used where two stone members met at a 45 degree angle and it was created by removing a small section of material from one part, thereby creating a socket for the other.
In masonry terms, this allows the bond of the masonry courses to to continue around a corner without a staggered vertical joint and and allows the mortar to truly bed into the corner of the joint.

In the cabinetmakers world the masons mitre allows for a strong and attractive joint, particularly on bench tops with rounded edges, and saves on the wastage of materials and additional labor costs that would result from the removal of large triangular sections that need to be cut in a traditional mitre joint.

The masons mitre joint can be a it of a challenge, but with a bit of practise and good jig for your router it’s quite achievable.

One of the best jigs I’ve used to achieve this joint is the APS 900 jig which is made by Festool. Whilst it looks a bit complex it’s actually fairly straight forward and gives you accurate and repeatable results.

Have a look at the video here from Festool TV where Festool demonstrator Frank Jaksch shows the how to use the APS 900 along with a Festool OF 2200 router to create a masons mitre joint.

It is dubbed in English and the picture is a bit dodgey at times but please persist, it is worth watching.

Anyways guys, I hope you enjoyed the video and if your not using it already, will soon be adding the masons mitre to your arsenal of joinery.

Thanks for reading and as always your comments and feedback are appreciated.

Be safe and have fun,

Cheers

Bryan

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